Amazon and Microsoft waiver of data egress charges

Having predictability and stability in costs is one of the major challenges for researchers in adopting cloud services, so it’s welcome news that AWS is removing egress charges for academic customers. – Dan Perry, director of product and marketing at Jisc

One specific area of interest is to make more use of Azure to support research and the concern with this has always been the cost of retrieving the data. This announcement today from Microsoft is a fantastic recognition of this challenge and will help us to find new ways to build Azure into our research infrastructure. – Liz Bailey, director of IT at the University of Leicester

The benefits of cloud services are becoming recognized by a wide range of educational institutions. We know that researchers and teachers are beginning to rely on cloud computing to facilitate new learning technologies and cutting edge research; working sustainably at break-neck speed is needed. It is now relatively straight forward to build a temporary, virtual super-computer on the cloud helping scientists analyse data pipelines and store petabytes of data. There is no cost for uploading data but the unpredictable expense of transferring it can be alarming.

We are aware of the level of worry in the educational community about unknown and unexpected costs that working in the cloud can throw up. Microsoft and Amazon Web Services have also recognised the concerns and they both now offer an egress waiver. The maximum discount for both is 15% of total monthly spending on AWS or Azure spending. The agreement has been reached through discussions with Jisc, GÉANT in Europe and DLT in the United States who provide network infrastructure and supporting cloud services.

This is already proving to be popular and is encouraging FE and HE institutions to be more confident in moving activity to the cloud. You can read more about the Amazon and Microsoft offers here and we will have other posts keeping you up to speed on how to benefit.

 

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